Outlining to Think

Outlining helps us organize our information so we can better think about it, prioritize and subordinate details, enter into conversations, and structure our work for presentation and publication.

Examples

By outlining we mean tree structures

How it works

  • Writing things up helps us to think. We write to check our understanding, clarify our thought, and to remember
  • This is about exploring, not simply reporting! Writing to explore, not to impress, will give you a chance to try out different ways of observing, note-taking, drafting, illustrating, reflection, soliciting feedback, and revision and so learn how to learn. See my Feedback
  • Learning from others. When you share on Dropbox the day before class, you will set yourself up to invite valuable feedback from me and others, have an opportunity to see what others have done, and in this comparison you will realise that what you’ve done is at least basically ok, where and how you might next time do things differently, and so replace “teacher: give me a good grade!” with “might you suggest how I might do things differently? See my Teamwork.
  • Developing your independence and autonomy. As you “learn how to learn”, you’ll know better what to do, how to do it, how to get started on a new project or overcome difficulties with others and on your own. See this short video on Courage.